Follow Up: 3 Important Nursing Interview Tips for New Grads

follow up nurse interviewIn part 3 of this three-part series of interview tips for new grads, you will learn how to follow up with your interviewers in order to make a lasting impression and impact.  The last thing you want is to walk out the door and your nurse interviewers immediately forget about you.  You want to be sure to reach out to your interviewers to show your appreciation and thank them for taking time out of their busy schedules to sit down and talk with you.



Nursing Interview Tips for New Grads Series

1. Prepare a Thank-You Note

Before you finish your nurse interview and leave, it is appropriate to ask your interviewer for permission to reach out to them via email, letter, or fax.  While this may not be totally necessary, it shows forward thinking and respect to your interviewer.  The nurse manager or interviewer you met with may receive hundreds of emails per day and the last thing you want to do is add yet another email to their inbox.  So it does not hurt to simply ask permission.

Whether you send a letter the old-fashioned way, send an email, or fax a letter over to your interviewer, you want to make sure you get a thank-you note to your nursing interviewer within 24 hours of completing your nursing interview.  In the first paragraph, we mentioned that the last thing you want is to walk out the door and your nurse interviewer forgets about you.  This is how you prevent that from happening.

In your letter, make sure you are thanking your interview and show your appreciation for them meeting you and taking time out of their busy schedules.  Be warm and professional.  Make sure you reiterate how you will be a valuable nurse to the facility and provide an example.  Thank-you letters also don’t have to be too long; so don’t write pages and pages. If you are going on multiple nurse interviews, make sure you re-write your thank-you letters and tailor them to the specific facility you are interviewing with.  If you interviewed in a hospital but re-use the thank-you letter you wrote for an interview you went to in a clinic, your interviewer will be thrown off and potentially think you’re lazy since anyone can copy & paste.

Here’s an example nurse interview thank you letter you can write:

Dear Nurse Manager/Hiring Manager/HR,

Thank you very much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to meet with me yesterday.  It was a pleasure talking with you about the position and learning more about the facility.   I particularly liked <insert something about the nursing rule that stood out to you> and am intrigued to learn more.  I feel I would be a valuable asset to the facility due to/because of my <insert skill, personality trait, or some other value-add that helps your case>.  If there is any further information you need from me, please feel free to reach out and let me know.

Once again, thank you very much for speaking with me. I appreciate your time and I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Your Name

2. Didn’t Like the Role?

So what happens if after your interview you feel like the position just isn’t for you?  Don’t sweat it.  It happens.  Sometimes you go into an interview for a nursing job that sounds great and totally up your alley until you start reviewing the answers the Nurse Manager gave you and it starts to turn you off.  It’s not the end of the world.

So what should you do?  Still send a follow-up thank-you letter.  Not only is it professional, but it shows good manners.  Remember, the follow-up letter to your interviewer is also a sign of respect. And your nurse interviewer will appreciate it.

At this point you might be asking, “So, now what?”  Well, in your letter you should mention that the nursing job isn’t for you, and still thank the interviews for their time.  The Nurse Manager and interviewers will appreciate it.  And if they liked you and were going to hire you for that position, they may point you in the direction of another nursing job they may be aware of at their own facility or somewhere else.

Here’s an example of this type of nurse thank you letter:

Dear Nurse Manager/Hiring Manager/HR,

Thank you very much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to meet with me yesterday.  It was a pleasure talking with you and learning more about the role.  Unfortunately though, I feel like I would not be a good fit for this role as it does not align with what I would like to be doing with my nursing career.  After researching some more, I feel like I would rather pursue my nursing career in <insert specialty>.  If you are aware of any nursing positions available in <specialty>, I would love to learn more about it.

Once again, thank you very much for speaking with me.  I appreciate your time and I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Your Name




3. Radio Silence

You’ve asked for permission to send your thank-you letter to the Nurse Manager, you’ve sent said letter, and you haven’t heard back from them in a few days.  Now what?  As long as you’ve waited at least 1 week, you are more than welcome to call Human Resources to check on the status of your nursing interview.  Understand that decisions are not made immediately and sometimes need to be ran passed multiple levels of nurses and management before you receive word back from the nurse manager or hiring manager.

When you call Human Resources, make sure you ask if there is any additional information you can provide to help your case.  You can also take the opportunity to ask if you should provide any references in addition to your resume (we mentioned this valuable nursing interview tip in part 1 of this series about references), or any other type of paperwork or information.

Also, and this should go without saying from us, make sure you reiterate to HR that you are still very interested in the position and say thank you again for the nurse manager/HR for taking their time out of their day to meet with you, and that you look forward to hearing from them.  Be warm, be kind, and make yourself stand out from the rest.

 

If you follow these steps from beginning to end, you are setting yourself up for success and to be the best nurse that you can be.

 


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